ES Allianz

14 Styles, 16 Sets

StyleCHF 70

FamilyCHF 490

Inspired by early sans serifs, which would then lead to the neo-grotesque style, Allianz makes light of the Zeitprobleme and spotlights the originality and sharpness of this type of character. Functional yet distinctive, this typeface, which could have belonged to New Typography in which representatives of contradictory art movements merged, is available here from A to Z, developed in a style based on undogmatic principles and surrealistic moments.

Allianz aims to impart a modernist spirit to contemporary works. An organic, yet concrete and subtly hand-drawn design, the typeface is both dense and readable, objective and lively. Published for the first time in the 2010s by David Mamie with the joint inspiration of Nicola Todeschini, Allianz is now available several years after its first draft with a set that includes multiple weights, alternates and symbols, to offer an original contemporary alternative to Antique classics.


ES Allianz Light Default set

Age-graded changes are usually thought of as changes in the use of a variant that recur at a particular age in successive generations. They are, then, regular and predictable changes that might be thought of as marking a developmental stage in the individual’s life. Few changes of this kind have been reported. One of the small matters is the name of the last letter of the alphabet. ‘Z’ is called “zed” everywhere in the world, not only in English but also in French, German, and most other languages, except in the United States, where it is called “zee”. Hence “zee” is an American shibboleth. The pattern of declining use of “zee” as people grow older repeats itself in succeeding generations in Southern Ontario. With the use of “zee” stigmatized, it is perhaps strange that children should learn it at all. One source is pre-school television shows beamed from the United States, notably one called Sesame Street, which was almost universally watched by children in the 1960s when it had no serious rivals. Hence the extraordinarily high frequency of “zee” among those 12-year-olds in 1979. Sesame Street and its imitators promote the alphabet with zeal, almost as a fetish, thus ensuring that their young viewers hear it early and recite it often. The “zee” pronunciation is reinforced especially by the “Alphabet Song,” a piece of doggerel set to music that ends with these lines:

ell em en oh pee cue, ar ess tee,

yoo vee double-yoo, eks wye zee.

Now I know my ey bee sees,

Next time, won’t you sing with me?

It is a story that can be written over and over again, generation after generation, unless the newpaper readers come to understand the sociolinguistic difference between a change in progress and an age-graded change.

ES Allianz Regular Default set

Age-graded changes are usually thought of as changes in the use of a variant that recur at a particular age in successive generations. They are, then, regular and predictable changes that might be thought of as marking a developmental stage in the individual’s life. One of the small matters is the name of the last letter of the alphabet. ‘Z’ is called “zed” everywhere in the world, not only in English but also in French, German, and most other languages, except in the United States, where it is called “zee”. Hence “zee” is an American shibboleth. The pattern of declining use of “zee” as people grow older repeats itself in succeeding generations in Southern Ontario. With the use of “zee” stigmatized, it is perhaps strange that children should learn it at all. One source is pre-school television shows beamed from the United States, notably one called Sesame Street, which was almost universally watched by children in the 1960s when it had no serious rivals. Hence the extraordinarily high frequency of “zee” among those 12-year-olds in 1979. Sesame Street and its imitators promote the alphabet with zeal, almost as a fetish, thus ensuring that their young viewers hear it early and recite it often. The “zee” pronunciation is reinforced especially by the “Alphabet Song,” a piece of doggerel set to music that ends with these lines:

ell em en oh pee cue, ar ess tee,

yoo vee double-yoo, eks wye zee.

Now I know my ey bee sees,

Next time, won’t you sing with me?

It is a story that can be written over and over again, generation after generation, unless the newpaper readers come to understand the sociolinguistic difference between a change in progress and an age-graded change.

ES Allianz Bold Default set

Age-graded changes are usually thought of as changes in the use of a variant that recur at a particular age in successive generations. They are, then, regular and predictable changes that might be thought of as marking a developmental stage in the individual’s life. One of the small matters is the name of the last letter of the alphabet. ‘Z’ is called “zed” everywhere in the world, not only in English but also in French, German, and most other languages, except in the United States, where it is called “zee”. Hence “zee” is an American shibboleth. The pattern of declining use of “zee” as people grow older repeats itself in succeeding generations in Southern Ontario. With the use of “zee” stigmatized, it is perhaps strange that children should learn it at all. One source is pre-school television shows beamed from the United States, notably one called Sesame Street, which was almost universally watched by children in the 1960s when it had no serious rivals. Hence the extraordinarily high frequency of “zee” among those 12-year-olds in 1979. Sesame Street and its imitators promote the alphabet with zeal, almost as a fetish, thus ensuring that their young viewers hear it early and recite it often. The “zee” pronunciation is reinforced especially by the “Alphabet Song,” that ends with these lines:

ell em en oh pee cue, ar ess tee,

yoo vee double-yoo, eks wye zee.

Now I know my ey bee sees,

Next time, won’t you sing with me?

It is a story that can be written over and over again, generation after generation, unless the newpaper readers come to understand the sociolinguistic difference between a change in progress and an age-graded change.

Single-storey a Antique A Alternate r Swing-legged R Round zero Alternate 1 Alternate 7 Alternate dollar and cent Small symbols Large bullet Classic cedilla Thin math symbols Single-storey at White bullets Circled Black circled

Alte Drucke und Rara. Wir verwalten die ältesten Bestände an gedruckten Büchern der Zentralbibliothek Zürich, die vor 1857 erschienen sind. Auch Raritäten des 19./20. Jahrhunderts sind ein Schwerpunkt unserer Sammlung.

  • TT
  • AA
  • VA
    • Italic
    A
    • Italic

    A Á Ă Ắ Ặ Ằ Ẳ Ẵ Ǎ  Ấ Ậ Ầ Ẩ Ẫ Ä Ạ À Ả Ā Ą Å Ã Æ A Á Ă Ǎ Â Ä À Ā Ą Å Ã Æ B C Ć Č Ç Ç Ĉ Ċ D Ð Ď Đ E É Ĕ Ě Ê Ế Ệ Ề Ể Ễ Ë Ė Ẹ È Ẻ Ē Ę Ẽ F Ƒ G Ğ Ǧ Ĝ Ģ Ġ H Ħ Ĥ I IJ Í Ĭ Ǐ Î Ï İ Ị Ì Ỉ Ī Į Ĩ J Ĵ K Ķ L Ĺ Ľ Ļ Ŀ Ł M N Ń Ň Ņ Ŋ Ñ O Ó Ŏ Ǒ Ô Ố Ộ Ồ Ổ Ỗ Ö Ọ Ò Ỏ Ơ Ớ Ợ Ờ Ở Ỡ Ő Ō Ø Õ Œ P Þ Q R Ŕ Ř Ŗ R Ŕ Ř Ŗ S Ś Š Ş Ŝ Ș ẞ T Ŧ Ť Ţ Ț U Ú Ŭ Ǔ Û Ü Ǘ Ǚ Ǜ Ǖ Ụ Ù Ủ Ư Ứ Ự Ừ Ử Ữ Ű Ū Ų Ů Ũ V W Ẃ Ŵ Ẅ Ẁ X Y Ý Ŷ Ÿ Ỵ Ỳ Ỷ Ȳ Ỹ Z Ź Ž Ż a á ă ắ ặ ằ ẳ ẵ ǎ â ấ ậ ầ ẩ ẫ ä ạ à ả ā ą å ã a á ă ǎ â ä à ā ą å ã æ æ b c ć č ç ç ĉ ċ d ð ď đ e é ĕ ě ê ế ệ ề ể ễ ë ė ẹ è ẻ ē ę ẽ f g ğ ǧ ĝ ģ ġ h ħ ĥ i ı í ĭ ǐ î ï ị ì ỉ ij ī į ĩ j ȷ ĵ k ķ l ĺ ľ ļ ŀ ł m n ń ň ņ ŋ ñ o ó ŏ ǒ ô ố ộ ồ ổ ỗ ö ọ ò ỏ ơ ớ ợ ờ ở ỡ ő ō ø õ œ p þ q r ŕ ř ŗ r ŕ ř ŗ s ś š ş ŝ ș ß t ŧ ť ţ ț u ú ŭ ǔ û ü ǘ ǚ ǜ ǖ ụ ù ủ ư ứ ự ừ ử ữ ű ū ų ů ũ v w ẃ ŵ ẅ ẁ x y ý ŷ ÿ ỵ ỳ ỷ ȳ ỹ z ź ž ż ff ft fi fl fft ffi ffl ª ª º d e m n r r s t ∆ Ω μ π 0 0 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 ⁰ ¹ ¹ ² ³ ⁴ ⁵ ⁶ ⁷ ⁸ ⁹ ⁄ ½ ⅓ ⅔ ¼ ¾ ⅖ ⅛ ⅜ ⅞ Ⅰ Ⅱ Ⅲ Ⅳ Ⅴ Ⅵ Ⅶ Ⅷ Ⅸ Ⅹ Ⅺ Ⅻ Ⅼ Ⅽ Ⅾ Ⅿ . , : ; … ! ¡ ? ¿ · • * # # / \ ( ) { } [ ] - – — _ ‚ „ “ ” ‘ ’ « » ‹ › " ' ₳ ฿ ₿ ¢ ¢ ¤ $ $ ₫ € ƒ ₣ ₲ ₴ ₭ ₤ ₺ ₼ ₦ ₱ ₽ ₹ ₪ £ ₸ ₮ ₩ ¥ + + × × ÷ ÷ = = > > < < ± ± ~ ~ ¬ ¬ ^ ^ µ µ % % ↑ ↗ → ↘ ↓ ↙ ← ↖ ↔ ↕ ↰ ↱ ↲ ↳ ⟲ ⟳ ⇄ ⇆ ○ ● ■ □ ▲ △ ▶ ▷ ▼ ▽ ◀ ◁ ◆ ◇ ◊ ◦ 🅐 🅐 🅑 🅒 🅓 🅔 🅕 🅖 🅗 🅘 🅙 🅚 🅛 🅜 🅝 🅞 🅟 🅠 🅡 🅡 🅢 🅣 🅤 🅥 🅦 🅧 🅨 🅩 Ⓐ Ⓑ Ⓒ Ⓓ Ⓔ Ⓕ Ⓖ Ⓗ Ⓘ Ⓙ Ⓚ Ⓛ Ⓜ Ⓝ Ⓞ Ⓟ Ⓠ Ⓡ Ⓢ Ⓣ Ⓤ Ⓥ Ⓦ Ⓧ Ⓨ Ⓩ ⓿ ❶ ❷ ❸ ❹ ❺ ❻ ❼ ❽ ❾ ⓪ ① ② ③ ④ ⑤ ⑥ ⑦ ⑧ ⑨ ◊ @ @ & ¶ § © © ® ® ™ ℅ ° | ¦ † ‡ ℓ № ℮             

    A Á Ă Ắ Ặ Ằ Ẳ Ẵ Ǎ  Ấ Ậ Ầ Ẩ Ẫ Ä Ạ À Ả Ā Ą Å Ã Æ A Á Ă Ǎ Â Ä À Ā Ą Å Ã Æ B C Ć Č Ç Ç Ĉ Ċ D Ð Ď Đ E É Ĕ Ě Ê Ế Ệ Ề Ể Ễ Ë Ė Ẹ È Ẻ Ē Ę Ẽ F Ƒ G Ğ Ǧ Ĝ Ģ Ġ H Ħ Ĥ I IJ Í Ĭ Ǐ Î Ï İ Ị Ì Ỉ Ī Į Ĩ J Ĵ K Ķ L Ĺ Ľ Ļ Ŀ Ł M N Ń Ň Ņ Ŋ Ñ O Ó Ŏ Ǒ Ô Ố Ộ Ồ Ổ Ỗ Ö Ọ Ò Ỏ Ơ Ớ Ợ Ờ Ở Ỡ Ő Ō Ø Õ Œ P Þ Q R Ŕ Ř Ŗ R Ŕ Ř Ŗ S Ś Š Ş Ŝ Ș ẞ T Ŧ Ť Ţ Ț U Ú Ŭ Ǔ Û Ü Ǘ Ǚ Ǜ Ǖ Ụ Ù Ủ Ư Ứ Ự Ừ Ử Ữ Ű Ū Ų Ů Ũ V W Ẃ Ŵ Ẅ Ẁ X Y Ý Ŷ Ÿ Ỵ Ỳ Ỷ Ȳ Ỹ Z Ź Ž Ż a á ă ắ ặ ằ ẳ ẵ ǎ â ấ ậ ầ ẩ ẫ ä ạ à ả ā ą å ã a á ă ǎ â ä à ā ą å ã æ æ b c ć č ç ç ĉ ċ d ð ď đ e é ĕ ě ê ế ệ ề ể ễ ë ė ẹ è ẻ ē ę ẽ f g ğ ǧ ĝ ģ ġ h ħ ĥ i ı í ĭ ǐ î ï ị ì ỉ ij ī į ĩ j ȷ ĵ k ķ l ĺ ľ ļ ŀ ł m n ń ň ņ ŋ ñ o ó ŏ ǒ ô ố ộ ồ ổ ỗ ö ọ ò ỏ ơ ớ ợ ờ ở ỡ ő ō ø õ œ p þ q r ŕ ř ŗ r ŕ ř ŗ s ś š ş ŝ ș ß t ŧ ť ţ ț u ú ŭ ǔ û ü ǘ ǚ ǜ ǖ ụ ù ủ ư ứ ự ừ ử ữ ű ū ų ů ũ v w ẃ ŵ ẅ ẁ x y ý ŷ ÿ ỵ ỳ ỷ ȳ ỹ z ź ž ż ff ft fi fl fft ffi ffl ª ª º d e m n r r s t ∆ Ω μ π 0 0 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 ⁰ ¹ ¹ ² ³ ⁴ ⁵ ⁶ ⁷ ⁸ ⁹ ⁄ ½ ⅓ ⅔ ¼ ¾ ⅖ ⅛ ⅜ ⅞ Ⅰ Ⅱ Ⅲ Ⅳ Ⅴ Ⅵ Ⅶ Ⅷ Ⅸ Ⅹ Ⅺ Ⅻ Ⅼ Ⅽ Ⅾ Ⅿ . , : ; … ! ¡ ? ¿ · • * # # / \ ( ) { } [ ] - – — _ ‚ „ “ ” ‘ ’ « » ‹ › " ' ₳ ฿ ₿ ¢ ¢ ¤ $ $ ₫ € ƒ ₣ ₲ ₴ ₭ ₤ ₺ ₼ ₦ ₱ ₽ ₹ ₪ £ ₸ ₮ ₩ ¥ + + × × ÷ ÷ = = > > < < ± ± ~ ~ ¬ ¬ ^ ^ µ µ % % ↑ ↗ → ↘ ↓ ↙ ← ↖ ↔ ↕ ↰ ↱ ↲ ↳ ⟲ ⟳ ⇄ ⇆ ○ ● ■ □ ▲ △ ▶ ▷ ▼ ▽ ◀ ◁ ◆ ◇ ◊ ◦ 🅐 🅐 🅑 🅒 🅓 🅔 🅕 🅖 🅗 🅘 🅙 🅚 🅛 🅜 🅝 🅞 🅟 🅠 🅡 🅡 🅢 🅣 🅤 🅥 🅦 🅧 🅨 🅩 Ⓐ Ⓑ Ⓒ Ⓓ Ⓔ Ⓕ Ⓖ Ⓗ Ⓘ Ⓙ Ⓚ Ⓛ Ⓜ Ⓝ Ⓞ Ⓟ Ⓠ Ⓡ Ⓢ Ⓣ Ⓤ Ⓥ Ⓦ Ⓧ Ⓨ Ⓩ ⓿ ❶ ❷ ❸ ❹ ❺ ❻ ❼ ❽ ❾ ⓪ ① ② ③ ④ ⑤ ⑥ ⑦ ⑧ ⑨ ◊ @ @ & ¶ § © © ® ® ™ ℅ ° | ¦ † ‡ ℓ № ℮             

    Language Coverage
    Basic Latin-1 / Mac Roman
    Latin Extended-A,
    Western Europe, Central Europe,
    South-West Europe,
    Vietnamese, Pinyin

    Abenaki, Afaan Oromo, Afar, Afrikaans, Albanian, Alsatian, Amis, Anuta, Aragonese, Aranese, Aromanian, Arrernte, Arvanitic, Asturian, Atayal, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Bashkir, Basque, Belarusian, Bemba, Bikol, Bislama, Bosnian, Breton, Bulgarian Romanization, Cape Verdean, Catalan, Cebuano, Chamorro, Chavacano, Chichewa, Chickasaw, Chinese Pinyin, Cimbrian, Cofan, Cornish, Corsican, Creek, Crimean Tatar, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dawan, Delaware, Dholuo, Drehu, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino, Finnish, Folkspraak, French, Frisian, Friulian, Gagauz, Galician, Ganda, Genoese, German, Gikuyu, Gooniyandi, Greenlandic, Guadeloupean, Gwichin, Haitian Creole, Han, Hawaiian, Hiligaynon, Hopi, Hotcak, Hungarian, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ilocano, Indonesian, Interglossa, Interlingua, Irish, Istroromanian, Italian, Jamaican, Javanese, Jerriais, Kaingang, Kala Lagaw Ya, Kapampangan, Kaqchikel, Karakalpak, Karelian, Kashubian, Kikongo, Kinyarwanda, Kiribati, Kirundi, Klingon, Kurdish, Ladin, Latin, Latino Sine, Latvian, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lombard, Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, Maasai, Makhuwa, Malay, Maltese, Manx, Maori, Marquesan, Meglenoromanian, Meriam Mir, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moldovan, Montagnais, Montenegrin, Murrinhpatha, Nagamese Creole, Nahuatl, Ndebele, Neapolitan, Ngiyambaa, Niuean, Noongar, Norwegian, Novial, Occidental, Occitan, Oshiwambo, Ossetian, Palauan, Papiamento, Piedmontese, Polish, Portuguese, Potawatomi, Qeqchi, Quechua, Rarotongan, Romanian, Romansh, Rotokas, Sami Inari, Sami Lule, Sami Northern, Sami Southern, Samoan, Sango, Saramaccan, Sardinian, Scottish Gaelic, Serbian, Seri, Seychellois, Shawnee, Shona, Sicilian, Silesian, Slovak, Slovenian, Slovio, Somali, Sorbian Lower, Sorbian Upper, Sotho Northern, Sotho Southern, Spanish, Sranan, Sundanese, Swahili, Swazi, Swedish, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tetum, Tok Pisin, Tokelauan, Tongan, Tshiluba, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvaluan, Tzotzil, Uzbek, Venetian, Vepsian, Vietnamese, Volapuk, Voro, Wallisian, Walloon, Waraywaray, Warlpiri, Wayuu, Welsh, Wikmungkan, Wiradjuri, Wolof, Xavante, Xhosa, Yapese, Yindjibarndi, Zapotec, Zazaki, Zulu, Zuni

    ES Allianz

    14 Styles, 16 Sets

    StyleCHF 70

    FamilyCHF 490

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